The Founders’ Plan

America’s Founding Fathers planned for the people to control the federal government through their influence on the House of Representatives. The Constitution established frequent direct elections (every two years) for representatives of relatively small districts to help ensure their accountability to the people.

The Senate was originally designed to be accountable to the state legislatures. But that dependency was reversed in 1913 with the 17th amendment, and now the states must beg their senators for government handouts.

The Founding Fathers also designed the branches of the federal government so that the House of Representatives, not the Executive branch (the president) (see “The Great American Swindle,” would wield the greatest power. In the Federalist No. 58,  “Father of the Constitution” James Madison argues in effect that a simple majority in the House alone, with its preeminent power over the purse, can eliminate unconstitutional spending.

The House does not do so today, because it is simply marching to a different drummer. Establishment Insiders are driving the accumulation of unaccountable power in Washington with highly coordinated campaigns that target our freedom and our prosperity.  These campaigns cleverly deceive the electorate regarding their organization and real objectives and thereby ensure that the electorate does not effectively defend itself.

The missing ingredient is an informed electorate supplying the House with the backbone to stand up to the betrayal.  Americans face several obstacles to controlling the House of Representatives today, which were not present in Madison’s time. Among those obstacles (see “Contemporary Obstacles“) are: 1) the Establishment’s dominant influence over the media of communications upon which most Americans depend to be informed; and 2) the grip of conspiratorial forces on the leadership of both major parties.

Nevertheless, those obstacles can be overcome by well planned and organized grassroots effort.